Category Archives: Blogging Community

Shades Of Green

600px-Color_icon_green.svg via Wikimedia

Green, green, my pool is green. We lost our pool guy a few months ago and being not too handy at pool maintenance ourselves our pool has gradually turned a deeper shade of green. I checked out the 38 shades of green listed on wikipedia to determine a match and it was a bit overwhelming. I like some of names of the colors like asparagus. Cal Poly Pomona green,  and dark moss green might be close.

Moss_covered_rocks,_Beddgelert_Forest_-_geograph.org.uk_-_542866

Moss covered rocks by Philip Halling

I had to pick Cal Poly Pomona green because I live in California for gosh sakes. There’s even a Slytherin green, cool! Just added 2 packages of Shock this morning and did some quick research on pool care. I think we need to hire someone to take care of the pool again. It might cost us some money but I am yielding due to our lack pool cleaning capability.

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Green Lacewing

Haven’t seen any of these lacewings lately. I will have to monitor my pyracantha when it starts to bloom again.


Stream of Consciousness Saturday is hosted by Linda G Hill. The prompt for today is ‘mon’. Color chart via wikimedia. Green lacewing by Gilles San Martin on Flickr.

Putting Leaves On The Tree

Passive is not my modus operandi when doing genealogical research. I have been doggedly pursuing leads on various free genealogy websites. I did not think I would find anything about my maternal grandmother’s family. I did not see much in Canada at first. My first attempts in Scotland came up empty. One reason was my grandmother always said she was from Glasgow. I couldn’t find any mention of my great-grandparents in Glasgow. There was one local genealogy group there that charges money to find your relatives. The idea of paying online in a different currency and using a credit card made me nervous. So I didn’t do that. Then I discovered FamilySearch.org, a free site run by the Mormons. And recently I found Scotland’s People.gov.uk which provides a bit of info free and will charge you if you want more. There are also some English and Canadian Archives. Family Search will give you access to documents like some death certificates, marriage and birth records, census records, and ship’s passenger lists.

SS Hesperian via Library and Archives Canada

Getting back to the hunt. I found them in Staffordshire, England and then traced them with Scotland’s People to Lanarkshire (Scotland), located documentation of my grandmother’s and one of her sister’s birth, found her two older sisters were married in Scotland, then traced most of the group to Halifax on ships’ passenger lists (so exciting!).  Turns out my grandmother was born in a parish not too far from Glasgow. Knowing the married names of the two sisters helped me find them in Canada. I discovered my great-grandmother’s maiden name, and I think I located her family in Staffordshire as well. I found my maternal grandparent’s marriage record in Nova Scotia and traced them to British Columbia where I discovered my mother living at 4 years old along with my great-grandmother. I found my maternal grandfather’s family in Nova Scotia and traced some of them to the US. It gets hard to locate people after the mid-1900s or so other than my immediate family records. The last published census in Canada is 1921. There was no census taken in England during the WWII years. There is an English register for 1939, and I found some info there. Ireland was the hardest with no verifiable information on my family.

This research is interesting, and it makes me feel a bit closer to my ancestors. I can imagine some of their hardships like traveling across the Atlantic in a ship with a baby without your husband, or as a little girl. Looking through lists of people’s families I saw that many people in those olden days died young. I wondered if there was an epidemic or did people die from hardships like overwork or not enough to eat. I wondered if some of my family were rogues.

Well, if they looked like Johnny Depp that might be ok.

Or were the places where they came from kind of dumpy.

I don’t want to be judgemental about any of my family. Let’s face it we probably all have skeletons in our closets.

I just realized today that Family Search.org automatically populated my family tree with A LOT of names I had spent time looking up by myself and on top of it they have birth dates and death dates which I had not found. I just haven’t discovered anyone who is still alive in current times.


Stream of Consciousness Saturday is hosted by Linda G Hill. Today’s prompt words ‘passive/aggressive.’ Featured image of Norman Rockwell Family Tree via Lori on Flickr.GIFs from Giphy.com

Smiley

This month for the We Are The World Blogfest I am sharing a light-hearted little story I found from Smithsonian.org. We all use the little smiley face emoji with our blogs all the time. This article The Proliferation of Happiness shares a brief history of Positive Psychology and a bit about the man who invented the ‘smiley face.’

“It took only ten minutes for Harvey Ball to create the Smiley face. In 1963, the State Mutual Life Assurance Company in Worcester, Massachusetts, hired him to come up with a design that would help raise the morale of its employees.”
Harvey Ball was an artist and trained sign painter who was paid $45 for the design. The original Smiley face was not patented, but he did license one version with his World Smile Corporation in 1999. “The Corporation licenses Smileys and organizes World Smile Day World Smile Day raises money for the Harvey Ball World Smile Foundation, a non-profit charitable trust that supports children’s causes. World Smile Day is held on the first Friday of October each year and is a day dedicated to “good cheer and good works”. The catch phrase for the day is “Do an act of kindness – help one person smile”.-Wikipedia.
Authentic_Worcester-made_smiley_face,_Harvey_Ball

Authentic Worchester-made smiley face, Harvey Ball.

Harvey Ball and Harvey Ball Stamp


We Are The World Blogfest, #WATWB is scheduled for the last Friday of each month and is hosted by Belinda WitzenhausenSylvia McGrath, Sylvia Stein  Shilpa Garg, Eric Lahti 
Featured image ‘Beauty of love’ by Thai Jasmine on Flickr.
Sign up for We Are the World Blogfest!

Castle Keep

A keep is a tower used as a dungeon or fortress. Nenagh Castle keep is what is left of many towers that were part of the original castle built in 1216 by Baron Butler. He was given this land by the King of England, who was a Norman king. The castle was built in O’Kennedy territory, John F. Kennedy’s ancestors.

I have been doing a little research on a part of Tipperary, Ireland which was the last known residence of a cousin and the supposed birthplace of my paternal grandparents. The address for the cousin was Ballinamoe New Town Nenagh Tipperary. I couldn’t understand all the names in the address.  Turns out it breaks down to Ballinamoe as townland,  Newtown is a hamlet, part of the barony of Owney and Arra, the civil parish of Youghalarra, Nenagh is the largest town, in the county of Tipperary, in the Provence of Munster. Reading some of the history of baronies and all these other designations has been mind-boggling. Nenagh Castle is a historic site in Tipperary. I once read that my father’s surname Barry was Norman, which now makes sense if this was once Norman territory.

So enough with the history and geography for now and I only skimmed the surface. It has been disheartening to try to trace my father’s family in Ireland. There is no record online of my grandfather’s birth. There was one entry for someone with a similar name to my grandmother but no way for me to verify it was her. The dearth of information could be because some church records have not been digitalized, the Irish revolution that occurred in 1919-1921, and a fire during the Battle of Dublin resulted in archives being lost. Many records may still be in churches, and the only way to find them is to go there. The history of my father’s family in California is easier to trace although I did not find anything about his Uncle Joe and descendants.  I can research newspaper archives in Ireland, but I have to pay a subscription of 30 (pounds) a month, currently $42.45 US. I can pay someone to the do the research for me and that sounds even more expensive. The most recent Irish census information available is from 1911. In that census I did find a name of a girl who could be my cousin but how to verify it? and that person had sisters. I had a letter from my paternal aunt (now deceased) who gave me some names and birthdates. She told me my grandfather had brothers and my grandmother had 3 sisters and one brother. My grandparents emigrated to the US with their baby son in 1902. They lived through the San Francisco earthquake in 1906. My aunt corresponded with the cousin in Ballinamoe. She indicated the family in Ireland probably died out with that cousin but not sure. Two of my paternal grandmother’s sisters emigrated to Canada. Haven’t started looking for them yet.

My mother’s parents came from Canada. My maternal grandmother was born in Scotland. I found a record of my maternal grandparent’s marriage in Nova Scotia and possibly my maternal grandfather’s family of origin. My mother and her sister lost touch with these relatives. It is sad to think about all these people who have disappeared without a trace. It feels like I have lost part of my family all over again.

We should keep more than our towers.


Stream of Consciousness Saturday is hosted by Linda G Hill. The “Friday prompt for Stream of Consciousness Saturday is “picture.” Write about, or theme your post on the first picture you see when you sit down to start writing. You don’t need to describe the picture necessarily–you can even put yourself in it if you’re not already there.”

Featured image of Nenagh Castle by Regina Hill via wikimedia.org

The Green

via Missouri History Museum

Saturday, March 17 is St. Patrick’s Day and there is a tradition here in the US to wear a bit of the green to denote you are Irish, in spirit at least. I tell myself I should learn more about my Irish roots. My father’s family came from Tipperary but we were never in contact with anyone from there, except my paternal aunt corresponded with a cousin but my aunt is deceased, and I am sure the cousin is too. There could be some descendants there. I tried looking up the town on a map of Ireland and could not find it. It might have been my aunt’s penmanship or mis-spelling. She had Ballinamoe, New Town Nenagh, Tipperary as the address of the cousin. Any advice on how to find family in Ireland? Then there’s my mother’s family who came from Canada….

Let’s have a glass of Guinness with Dervish performing ‘Swallow’s Tail’ on You Tube:

 

The Irish language is very interesting and hard for me to pronounce. It is possible my ancestors spoke Gaelic.

I have heard it is good for our brains to learn a new language. So I was interested in an opportunity I found on Twitter. I can learn Klingon for free. Sounds like fun, but I hope they have an audio part because I am not sure how to pronounce it. It’s quite a tongue twister. Might be easier to learn Gaelic. Learn Irish on duoLingo.

Happy St. Patrick’s Day! 


 

Stream of Consciousness Saturday is hosted by Linda G Hill. Today’s prompt is ‘green.’ Dancing shamrocks from Google on giphy.com

 

Devoted Pet

 

kitten

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Are you finished packing?

Not yet. There is so much to consider, a lifetime.

You won’t need that much because everything will be provided for you.

It’s just hard to leave everything, so many memories.

I can’t leave without you. You mean so much to me.

I am grateful to you for that. You know I love you too.

We do not have much time left.

I will try to hurry. Explain to me again, why we need to leave.

You know why. I have told you many times.

Yes, but tell me again. It will help me to get ready.

The atmosphere here has passed the tipping point. Soon, it will not support life.

I believe what you have told me but how can I leave the only home I have ever known?

All of your family is gone. You have nothing left here.

Are you sure your culture will accept me?

Our race has existed here for almost 10 millennia. We have been observing and learning about you for all that time. We have to board the transport soon.

I can’t call you Fluffy anymore. I must get used to calling you by your true name, Bastet.


This post is for Week #11-2018 Flash Fiction for the Purposeful Practitioner hosted by Roger Shipp.

Word count: 200

 

 

 

 

Adventures In Dining

 

burger

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I’d like the burger with fries.

Sounds good. What kind of fries do you want? We’ve got shoe string, steak cut, chili cheese, garlic, sweet potato, blue cheese, and portobello.

That’s a lot of choices. How does anyone make up their mind?

It depends if you’re traditional or adventurous.

I’m feeling adventurous. I had a terrible day at work, and my boss is an unimaginative jerk. What’s the most adventurous thing on your menu?

That would be the Godzilla.

I’ll give that a shot.

A busboy clearing off the leftovers remarked, “That Godzilla is such a messy eater.”

 

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/af/Godzilla%281995%2Crepaint%29_Head_at_Abeno_Harukas_Art_Museum_August_31%2C_2014.jpg/320px-Godzilla%281995%2Crepaint%29_Head_at_Abeno_Harukas_Art_Museum_August_31%2C_2014.jpg

 


This micro-fiction is for Week #10-2018  Flash Fiction for the Purposeful Practitioner hosted by Roger Shipp. Click on the link if you want to join in.

Word count: 98

Let’s celebrate!