Heavenly Bamboo And Not Heavenly Pepper Trees

“They know, they just know where to grow, how to dupe you, and how to camouflage themselves among the perfectly respectable plants, they just know, and therefore, I’ve concluded weeds must have brains.”
~ Dianne Benson, Dirt, 1994.

There are many trees, bushes, and plants in our backyard whose true identity is a mystery to me. They were already here when we bought this house or have sprung up as volunteers. Up until now I have not paid them much attention. I have used the internet to successfully identify some of my succulents, cacti, and clover-like ground cover, ( aka Wood Sorrel). I mentioned my search to my daughter and she told me I could get an App for my phone, take photos of the plant/tree, and get it identified. I was a bit frustrated in my first attempts using the App. But yesterday I asked the opinion of The Horticulturist, a feature of the App, and got the answer. I was really off on the wrong track in my identification of some of the bushes. I thought they were Chokecherry. I got off on a tangent with the Chokecherry. It has a long history in North America and strong ties to Native Americans who harvested the cherries.  Turns out they are not Chokecherry and they are two separate species. One is Heavenly Bamboo and the other Brazilian Pepper. We have a large Brazilian Pepper at the front of our house as do other neighbors. I have always liked the Pepper Tree in front. I knew it was a Pepper Tree but the one in the backyard looks more like a thicket or bush. It probably volunteered in our backyard with the help of birds who eat the peppers and then spread the seeds to other locations. The Heavenly Bamboo was probably spread by the birds as well because there are two smaller bushes of it in other locations in our yard. Now we have to figure out what to do with the Pepper trees because it can be invasive and I don’t want a backyard full of them.  At least the Heavenly Bamboo is not invasive.   🙂


One Liner Wednesday is hosted by Linda G Hill.

#1linerWeds badge by nearlywes.com

The Full Worm Moon

March is the beginning of Spring and according to The Old Farmer’s Almanac the first Full Moon of March is called Full Worm Moon by Native Americans. This is because Spring is the season when the earth gets warmer and the worms are supposed to return. You may ask where did the worms go during the winter? It turns out earthworms burrow down deep below the frost line and sit out the winter below ground. Other species of garden worms lay eggs and die. In the Spring, their eggs hatch. I have been digging around a little in my small patch in the backyard and I realize I haven’t come across any worms yet. I dug a hole to plant our new lime tree and just did battle with that Palm tree I told you about, and dug it up, but I did not see any worms. The worms are supposed to attract birds and I have seen various birds pecking around in the yard but they could be eating other insects or seeds. I am now officially on worm watch. Maybe it’s due to global warming.  😉


Stream of Consciousness Saturday is hosted by Linda G Hill. The prompt word is “march.” Featured image of ‘Robin catching worm in Spring’ via wikimedia.

If You Like Giffs

I am just starting to add GIFs to some of my posts and find they do add something extra and hopefully interesting. I wanted to give a shout out to dalecooper57 @diaryofaninternetnobody.com who has offered to create free GIFs for fellow bloggers. He has an interesting blog and you can go check it out. He created one for me which is my featured image. How do you like it? Maybe you’ll want one too.


Note: You may have realized I am not a super tech savvy person. I have been learning a lot since I started blogging but I am still learning. GIFs are something fairly new to me. So I did some research and learned that GIF is an acronym for Graphic Interchange Format and the GIF in my post is an animated GIF. I noticed that there are do it yourself GIF websites. Wonder how easy they are to use?

In My Garden-Volunteers

” I do some of my best thinking while pulling weeds.”- Martha Smith

Volunteer-“In gardening and agronomic terminology, a volunteer is a plant that grows on its own, rather than being deliberately planted by a farmer or gardener. Volunteers often grow from seeds that float in on the wind, are dropped by birds, or are inadvertently mixed into compost.” (Wikipedia)

I have a couple of plants in my garden that are popping up without any help or encouragement from me. We did plant one of them but it is popping up in other spots. I have identified it as Sedum rubrotinctum aka Jelly Bean or Pork and Beans plants. Here are some photos of mine:

I think there were more that I pulled up when they were babies because I thought they were some kind of weed.  Another plant (tree) that grows like a weed are Palm trees. If you have a Palm tree anywhere nearby you will find little Palm tree seedlings popping up like weeds all over your yard. And you have to be vigilant in pulling them out or pretty soon you will have a tree where you may not want one. We ended up with a huge Palm tree against our wall, from a volunteer like that, and another one in our front yard.

This is what they look like if you catch them early:

Palm Tree Seedlings

As I was surveying the plants in my backyard,  I came across this hiding under some other bushes against one wall:

We will have to dig it up or end up with a much bigger tree in the near future.

In a recent post I mentioned there was clover growing in my garden, which also is a volunteer. I was thinking a neighbor may have some clover in their garden and the seeds spread to mine. Well, while researching the type of “clover” it might be, I discovered it is not clover but something called “Yellow wood sorrel” or Oxalis stricta. It grows wild so it is a volunteer. In small amounts it can be edible and medicinal. It is sour tasting and  a thirst quencher if you chew a bit of it.  The leaves close up in bright sun. I noticed some of the “clover” leaves were doing that too.  I like the look of it but I don’t necessarily want it to take over the backyard, but it is pretty and has a pretty name ‘wood sorrel.’ I am going to have to look for a different ground cover to fill in the bare spots. I took some photos of the sorrel this morning. You can see some of the leaves partially closed. The yellow flowers are closed this morning. We had rain yesterday and the sun is not so bright right now, a little cloudy today.

Some good news is that we planted our Lime tree.

And the Sage plants are doing well and really blooming:


Featured Image of Sedum r. by Frank Vincentz via Wikipedia.  One Liner Wednesday is hosted by Linda G Hill.

#1linerWeds badge by nearlywes.com

Life After Work

I started writing about this idea on Stream of Consciousness Saturday, where I am in my life or the transition from work to not as much work. I have ( finally) made peace with the idea that career/work is not the main and most important part of my life any more. I am now moving past it. I am not wanting a career type role anymore. I do not miss it. And there is life after career life. Just thought I would let you know.  ❤

Barbara Bush Rose via wikipedia


Featured image is Sereno, Calm by oznicko on Pixabay.com

Nature Therapy

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Goosenecks State Park Overlook photo by Bob Wick

 

“The 1.35 million-acre Bears Ears National Monument in southeastern Utah protects one of most significant cultural landscapes in the United States, with thousands of archaeological sites and important areas of spiritual significance. Abundant rock art, ancient cliff dwellings, ceremonial kivas, and countless other artifacts provide an extraordinary archaeological and cultural record, all surrounded by a dramatic backdrop of deep sandstone canyons, desert mesas, and forested highlands and the monument’s namesake twin buttes. These lands are sacred to many Native American tribes today, who use the lands for ceremonies, collecting medicinal and edible plants, and gathering materials for crafting baskets and footwear. Their recommendations will ensure management decisions reflect tribal expertise and traditional and historical knowledge.”-Bob Wick of the US Bureau of Land Management about his photo on Flickr

Managing Transitions

I just dropped in to see what condition my transition was in. I have managed to be going through a transition for a few years. One transition seems to be leading into another. I started my blog while in the middle of a transition from having a career to not. External circumstances thrust that change upon me. I felt like I was pushed into semi-retirement without having chosen it. My blog has been part of an exploration of what I am doing next. I have enjoyed being creative with my writing, but I do not want to do it full-time or be a writer of books.  I have been tutoring part-time for a few years. I have struggled with the first transition. Going from a career oriented life to getting oriented to a life with no career. Or at least a job I had not planned on doing. I had planned to transition from a teaching full-time to a part-time teaching career eventually, but my plan did not work out as I envisioned. I never got the full-time teaching position. I worked as a substitute teacher for a while:

Then I started tutoring to see if that would develop into a business.  Although I felt I was doing something good, I decided I didn’t want to develop it into something full-time.  Now it feels like I am coming into another transition. I have been restless for quite a while. It’s just that the unknown makes me feel uneasy. Getting ready to let go of what I have been, and step into…..wherever my path may lead me next. Need to be willing to let it unfold by itself.

But the cacti are still flowering in my yard and I may soon be rolling in clover.  🙂  That’s my ever optimistic voice talking.

Clover in my backyard


Stream of Consciousness Saturday is hosted by Linda G Hill. Prompt word ” man.” Video of Kenny Rogers and First Edition ‘I just dropped in to see what condition my condition was in‘ via 2old2Rock on You Tube.  Featured image of Hummingbird on nest by jadis96 via Pixabay.com Video of teacher in class via Giphy.com