Rosh Hashana Dinner

I had a small family dinner party for Rosh Hashana. My menu for the dinner included fresh chicken soup and brisket. I added the home-made kreplach we had in our freezer to the soup along with matzo balls.

Homemade Chicken Soup with kreplach

Homemade Chicken Soup with kreplach and matzo balls

20140927_123504   Chicken Soup with Matzo Ball and Kreplach

I don’t have many of my own pictures because I was cooking all this the day of the dinner and it is a lot of work. Next time, I hope to cook some of the food ahead of time.

I really enjoy cooking holiday meals with my family.  We all work together to make all the dishes.

My daughter was here and she helped a lot with shopping and some of the cooking. She made a delicious noodle kugel and a spinach salad with pomegranate seeds and pear. She bought the flowers, sage honey and some scented candles.

20140925_125959  Rosh Hashana 2014

My husband helped with some shopping as well and picked up a pretty round chocolate chip challah.

4969120397_68a6dc0563_z   Round Challah

It was hard getting everyone together. My daughter Kate had special plans for this weekend so I decided to make the dinner on Thursday night. My son Scott was working late but managed to come over with his lovely wife Jennie. They had helped make the kreplach with me a few weeks ago.

Two of my husband’s brothers and one of their wives made up the rest of our dinner party. I feel it is important for the family to be together and make happy memories.

I have a recipe I follow from my mother-in-law for the chicken soup. I have made it so many times over the years and it changes slightly each time I make it. This time I added a larger rutabaga and I think it gave the broth a sweeter taste. My daughter suggested I add some kale.

My mother-in-law Mary Lynn used to tell me that many Jewish women in the old days did not have their recipes written down with the exact ingredient measurements. Or they might leave out an ingredient when passing on a recipe. She told me a Yiddish expression ” shitararyn” which she said meant put in it or pour it in when adding an ingredient.

I used Judy Zeidler’s The Gourmet Jewish Cook book recipe for the brisket which is made with prunes and apricots  and with brown sugar in the recipe. This gives it a slightly sweet taste.

2731918560_f9f4c3173e_z  Brisket

It is a tradition to include sweet foods like honey for New Year because this means you will have a sweet year.

One of my brother-in-law’s made a Honey Cake from his mother’s recipe.

My daughter had a lovely idea about doing a Tshuvah activity where we would all set our intentions for the New Year and ask ourselves what do we want to cast off and what do we want to keep in our lives.

I regret we did not get to this activity at the dinner but I would like to incorporate it into future Rosh Hashana dinners. I want to think about my own intentions during this week for the coming year.

9 thoughts on “Rosh Hashana Dinner

  1. Audrey Meltzer

    Your dinner sounds like one of your all-out efforts to create a lovely meal and to bring family together. The delicious foods and the rituals symbolising the Jewish New Year, reflecting the concept of bringing sweetness and joy into the coming year, seem well represented in your loving intentions.
    I remember my sister MaryLynn’s and our mother Dorothy trying to teach us how to make blintzes and her saying – when we asked her to measure the ingredients so we could write them down – “It’s a shitarayn!” (We finally slowed her down sufficiently to get them.)
    I think the idea of your incorporating Tshuvah into your Rosh Hashanah dinners in the future is a wonderful one.
    L’shona Tovah!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Deborah Drucker Post author

      Thanks Audrey! I think like all experienced cooks the grandmothers knew the ingredients of recipes by heart and did not worry about careful measurments or having the recipes written down. And your mother Dorothy (Nana) knew many recipes by heart.

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      Reply

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